THATCamp New England October 19-20

I just received the announcement about THATCamp New England being hosted at Brown on October 19-20. I encourage any faculty interested in the intersection of humanities and technology to attend.

The third annual THATCamp New England will be held at Brown University in Providence, RI, on Friday, October 19, and Saturday, October 20.
THATCamp (“The Humanities and Technology Camp”) is an unconference around the topic of how technology is influencing teaching, research, and service among humanists at universities and colleges. THATCamp New England 2012 is being hosted by Brown University with the generous support and sponsorship of NERCOMP.

The conference will have two parts. First, the conference will have a day of workshops, all day Friday. These hands-on, instructor-led sessions will introduce participants to the basic skills, tools, and concepts of the digital humanities, with no prior experience required or assumed. We are planning short workshops on text encoding, database concepts and visualization, among others.

Second, on Saturday there will be a number of “unconference” sessions.
Participants will propose session topics on the conference website in advance. On the morning of the conference, participants will vote on the topics to create the schedule for the rest of the day.

Participants will then organize discussions or work together on various technologies, rather than reading and responding to papers.

THATCamp is a conference that welcomes graduate students, faculty, educational technologists, librarians, museum professionals and anyone else who is working or wants to work in the humanities and with technology. For more information about THATCamp, see http://thatcamp.org .

To register, go to http://newengland2012.thatcamp.org/.

To borrow and repurpose from a Digital Humanities Questions and Answers discussion, you should be interested in Digital Humanities, and you should attend THATCamp if:

–You use emerging technologies to rethink what “the humanities” is all about.
–You collaborate with people across disciplines and backgrounds to explore innovations in academia –You are willing to experiment with new pedagogies and research approaches made possible by new technologies –You are not afraid to work closely and collaboratively with your friendly neighborhood technologist –You are willing to take a do it yourself approach to creating the tools and technologies you need for your teaching and/research –You use technology in a way that disregards traditional boundaries between disciplines and hierarchies –I’m sure others will have different and additional perspectives, but that’s what springs to my mind first.

[http://digitalhumanities.org/answers/topic/what-is-digital-humanities]